FISHING METHODS

The choice of how to fish has a decisive impact on the equilibrium of the ecosystem and on the future of the sea.

Discover the rules applied by ASDOMAR for its entire production in the Sustainable Fishing Policy and get to know the main fishing methods:

POLE AND LINE FISHING

In pole & line fishing, the schools of tuna are spotted visually. Bait is thrown into the water to attract the tuna and water sprayers are used to give the impression of a school of small fish on the surface. The fishermen then throw the lines into the water and in just a few seconds haul the tuna on board.

For industrial use of the tuna, the fishing vessels dedicated to pole & line fishing, which are smaller than those used for purse seine fishing, must be equipped with modern freezing systems on board.

Consequently, of all the tuna caught through this method (approximately 10% of the total caught globally), only 3-5% is for industrial production, while the remainder is designated for local consumption.

PURSE SEINE FISHING ON FREE SCHOOLS

Fishing on free schools involves identifying a school of tuna and surrounding it with a special large circular net which encloses the area of sea where the fish is concentrated.

When the school is surrounded, the bottom of the net is closed and slowly pulled together, so the fish is concentrated in a small space and can be retrieved.

Together with line fishing it is the only form of fishing that can be used for mature yellowfin tuna (over 20 kg) as adult tuna of this species do not aggregate under FAD. This form of fishing is carried out by large, modern fishing boats equipped with suitable freezing systems for the industrial use of tuna.

PURSE SEINE FISHING ON FAD

To maximise the capture of skipjack tuna, purse seine fishing systems have been accompanied by the use of Fish aggregating devices or FADs. FADs are floating objects that become gathering points for various species of fish seeking protection and food.

These systems are now technologically advanced (equipped with radio-satellite location systems and sonar) and able to inform fishing vessels on their location and on the quantity of fish aggregated there.

Apart from skipjack tuna, the FADs aggregate other species as well (sharks, mantas, turtles, etc.) and young specimens of other tuna species (yellowfin tuna and bigeye tuna), which end up in the net accidentally.

Their intensive and uncontrolled use (with over 100,000 new FADs released into the oceans each year) risks destroying the marine ecosystem and depleting the yellowfin and bigeye tuna stocks.

SUSTAINABLE FISHING POLICY

All As do Mar brand tuna is produced in accordance with our regulations for sustainable fishing.

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